Credit ‘Wear’ Credit is Due – Carrie Ann Inaba


Robin Maryland, president, ActSensuous

     As you must know by now, I am nothing if not fair.   I’ve criticized Carrie Ann Inaba in earlier posts because she didn’t wear pantyhose during appearances that called for it, be it on late night talk shows, red carpet events, or on Dancing with the Stars. 

     I have searched for pics of Carrie Ann on the Internet, and here’s what I’ve found.  I have NEVER seen a photo of her wearing pantyhose.  Let me repeat that: NEVER!  Not one picture out of the hundreds and hundreds of them on the net.  

     So when I learned she was going to be the host of the new version of the game show, 1 vs. 100, I figured she wouldn’t wear dresses or skirts, and certainly not pantyhose, but I hoped with all my energy that she would. 

     Well, I am so happy to say that she has not let me down.  I’ve watched … I don’t know … half a dozen or so episodes, and in each case, she has worn a nice dress or skirt and sheer pantyhose – every single time.  I am so proud of her.  

     Does this mean she is maturing?  Exercising good judgment?   Showing she has class and professionalism?  Or maybe it’s the producer of the game and/or the Game Show Network (GSN) who is making the calls here.  

     Either way, she looks fantastic.  I mean she is such a beautiful woman, it was such a shame that she never showed any class or professionalism the way she dressed before.

      As a TV game show hostess, well, she’s no Bob Saget, who hosted the original version of the game show, but hey, who is? 

     In fact, many fans of the show have complained (justifiably so) that her voice is annoying, she has no sense of timing and she seems very uncomfortable.  That was all true, but I figured with time, she would improve, and she has. 

     The show may not survive, but it wouldn’t be Carrie Ann’s fault.  It just isn’t compelling with the top prize (if a contestant outlasts 100 opponents in answering multiple choice questions) being a whopping $50,000, when it was $1 million in the original version.  And then there’s the mob itself – 100 people who are shown via web cams, instead of live on the set as in the original.   I think for this show to survive, it has to make some major adjustments. 

     But this post is about Carrie Ann stepping up in a new role for herself – game show hostess.   I am proud of her for dressing professionally and with class and grace.  Of the several episodes I’ve seen, there were only two in which she (sorry) looked ridiculous – the ones where she wore a short skirt and knee-high boots.  Yuk! 

     Since I can’t find stills from the show online, I decided to take some pics myself with my cheap digital camera on my 15-year-old 60-inch TV.   I couldn’t get close enough because the set lighting is so bright, and the picture quality of my TV is better viewed from at least 12 feet away. 

     So while the pics I’m posting here aren’t of good quality, at least they’ll give you the idea of the outfits Carrie Ann is wearing.  

     Here’s what I want to know, and not just about, Carrie Ann:  When you look this good in a skirt and high heels and pantyhose, why would you ever wear goofy, dumpy, sloppy, ugly boots?  It’s the least feminine look there is. 

      Since the two episodes in which she wore those awful boots, Carrie Ann has worn high heels the past four or so episodes in a row.  I would hope that she sees what she looks like in boots, as compared to high heels, and made a conscious decision to pretty up her look.  

     I hope this is not just a fluke.  I hope Carrie Ann sees the light now, and that this is the beginning of a career choice for her – to dress femininely, and with class and professionalism when appearing on nationally televised shows.  

     For what it’s worth, Carrie Ann finally has won me over.  Like another game show hostess – Meredith Vieira – she is doing the right thing.  She is showing class, and she looks beautiful and glamorous in a skirt, sheer pantyhose and high heels in a venue that calls for it. 

     Good for you, Carrie Ann.

‘Burlesque’ a great movie/musical for Pantyhose


     If not for her starring role in the upcoming movie/musical, “Burlesque,” Christina Aguilera likely would have made her way into my column, Credit ‘Wear’ Credit is Due.  That’s because, long before Lady Gaga, Katy Perry, Beyonce and a handful of other current pop stars, Aguilera has been a devoted pantyhose wearer on and off stage.  

     “Burlesque,” which opens in theaters on Nov. 24, gives me an excuse to recognize Aguilera now for her pantyhose prowess. 

     Born Dec. 18, 1980, Christina Aguilera is an American pop singer, songwriter, dancer, and officially now, actress.   Known during her childhood as “the little girl with the big voice,” singing in local talent shows and competitions, Aguilera always aspired to be a singer. 

     Indeed, Aguilera has been compared to the likes of Mariah Carey and Whitney Houston.  A review in the Los Angeles Times compared Aguilera’s vocal stylings to Barbra Streisand, Gladys Knight and Aretha Franklin.  

     “Burlesque” stars Aguilera in a role it seems she was born to play: A small-town girl, Ali (Aguilera), ventures to Los Angeles and finds her place (as well as love, family and success) at a neo-burlesque club run by a former dancer (aptly played by Cher). 

     In the movie, the burlesque club apparently encompasses not just striptease and comedy routines, but modern dance and mini-theatrical plays, performed by barely dressed women in fishnets. 

     Beginning in the early 18th century, burlesque was a form of musical and theatrical parody, in which a serious or romantic opera, or a classical theatre piece, was adapted in a broad, often risqué style that ridiculed stage conventions.

     The popular burlesque show of this period eventually evolved into the striptease which became the dominant ingredient of burlesque by the 1930s. 

     Stockings were around as early as the 16th century, mostly in the black wool variety, until silk stockings debuted in the 17th century.  These garments helped define the burlesque era.

     During the 1920s, silk or artificial silk (rayon) stockings ruled the flapper era of the Roaring 20s. 

     After World War I (1914-1918) short skirts were fashionable and long silk stockings were worn. Nylon was invented in 1930 by Dupont, and after World War II (1939-1945), nylon stockings became popular and completely replaced silk stockings until the late 1960s, when pantyhose replaced stockings and never looked back.

     Previews for “Burlesque,” look very exciting – lots of great music, dancing and pantyhose-adorned legs in action.  

     While pantyhose hadn’t been invented during the burlesque era, today, Hollywood and modern live burlesque-style shows can and do take creative license in adding the sexy wardrobe accessories to the costumes for movies and musicals depicting the jazz, burlesque and flapper eras from as early as the 16th century, to the roaring 20s, through today. 

     And here’s something I love: when some of the dancing girls in these movies wear nylon stockings, they usually are wearing very sheer-to-waist pantyhose underneath them.  But mostly, I love that the majority of the dancers in these movies just wear pantyhose, as if no one would notice or care that that makes the film historically inaccurate.  I don’t care.  I love that pantyhose are viewed as so important and necessary by the writers, directors and/or costumers of these productions.

     During the 2000s, there have been quite a few successful movies depicting the jazz, burlesque and flapper eras.

Nine’ 

     This movie/musical, described as vibrant and provacative, tells the story of film director Guido Contini (Daniel Day-Lewis) as he contends with personal and professional crises near his 40th birthday, while trying to balance the demands of numerous women in his life including his wife (Marion Cotillard), his mistress (Penelope Cruz), his muse (Nicole Kidman) and his confidant (Judi Dench). 

     Set in 1960s Venice, “Nine” was directed by Rob Marshall (who also directed “Chicago”) and also starred Kate Hudson, Stacy “Fergie” Ferguson and Sophia Loren.  It was released in December 2009. 

     The original Broadway production debuted in 1982 and ran for 729 performances, winning five Tony Awards, including Best Musical.

 Chicago’

      “Chicago” is a dazzling spectacle that is extremely well written, well acted and wildly entertaining.  It centers on the themes of celebrity, scandal and corruption during Jazz Age Chicago.

     Velma Kelly (Catherine Zeta-Jones) and Roxie Hart (Renee’ Zellweger)  are two criminals-of-passion who find themselves awaiting trials for murder in 1920s Chicago.  Velma, a vaudevillian, and Roxie, a housewife with aspirations of having the same profession, fight for the fame that will keep them from the gallows.  The film also stars and gets fabulous performances from Richard Gere, Queen Laifah, John C. Reilly and Christine Baranski (“The Good Wife“). 

     Directed and choreographed by Rob Marshall, and adapted for film by screenwriter Bill Condon, “Chicago” won six Academy Awards in 2003, including Best Picture.

 ‘Moulin Rouge!

    A young English writer ventures to Paris during the 1899 Bohemian revolution that holds in its grip the city’s drug- and prostitute-infested underworld, never more evident than at the Moulin Rouge night club.  

     The movie/musical of 2001, directed, produced, and co-written by Baz Luhrmann, was nominated for eight Oscars, including Best Picture, Best Actress for Nicole Kidman, and won two: for art direction and costume design.

     The movie stars Ewan McGregor as Christian, a young, English poet/writer, who falls in love with Nicole Kidman as Staine, a cabaret actress and the star courtesan of the Moulin Rouge. 

     The production is lush and elaborate, featuring the musical setting of the Montmartre Quarter of Paris, France. 

      I haven’t seen “Nine” yet, but I plan to buy the DVD.  “Chicago” and “Moulin Rouge!” were great movies for showcasing pantyhose.   It appears that “Burlesque” will be a great movie for pantyhose lovers, too.  

     I just hope “Burlesque” delivers a story with as much charm and fun of “Chicago.”   From the previews I’ve seen, it certainly appears that the glitter and glam is there.  We’ll find out beginning on Nov. 24. 

     By the way, I intentionally left out the movie, “Showgirls,” which was great for pantyhose, but a weak and poorly written/acted storyline in my opinion. 

     Perhaps this trend of movies/musicals depicting the jazz, burlesque and flapper eras will do as much for creating an attraction for pantyhose among young women, and sparking renewed interest in pantyhose among more seasoned viewers, much the same way pop stars, such as Madonna, Lady Gaga and others, have been doing recently.

     What do you think?  Do you like these kinds of movies/musicals that feature beautiful ladies in exotic costumes, including pantyhose?   The genre seems like a dream come true for those of us who can’t get enough of our favorites celebrities embracing pantyhose on the grandest of stages.

Pantyhose wearers catch more eyes


    

Robin Maryland, president, ActSensuous

     From time to time, I hear from ladies who say they love wearing pantyhose because of the extra attention they get from men when they do.  

    They say they love it when they catch men staring at their pantyhose-adorned legs out in public. 

     Others tell me that their boyfriends or husbands are so grateful whenever they wear pantyhose, that they wear them often to please their men.

   More than anyone else, I hear from ladies who wear pantyhose at the office, sometimes because it’s required, or at least, expected. 

     In offices where the wearing of pantyhose is not required or particularly encouraged, it’s the ladies who are highly professional and classy who wear pantyhose of their own volition.  Those are my heroes. 

     These ladies tell me that when they wear pantyhose, they get a great deal more attention from their male co-workers.  But they say that this often causes a sense of uneasiness or even resentment among their fellow female employees.

Office girls in Korea would never not wear pantyhose to work.

     They tell me that female co-workers will approach them and say something to the effect of “You know, you don’t have to wear pantyhose.  You can go bare-legged.”  Or, “How can you stand to wear pantyhose every day?” Or (and I love this one), “Pantyhose are so  ‘out’ these days.” 

     Well, you know me – I think it’s downright pathetic when women blindly jump on the bandwagon in the name of what is thought to be “in or out of fashion,” especially if it gives them an excuse to be less feminine and not as desirable.  And I think it’s just plain wrong when women use that same excuse to go against time-honored business acumen, and then try to encourage others to do so, as well.    

     Anyway, it got me thinking:  How many of you have been approached by your co-workers about your wearing pantyhose at the office?   Or how many of you have noticed that you get more attention from co-workers, those in your circle, or people on the street when you wear pantyhose?

     Are you seen as a threat to your fellow females who don’t wear pantyhose and don’t want you to wear them either?   (And is that to keep you from garnering the attention of men, or to help them somehow  justify their own choice to not wear pantyhose?) 

     I’ll bet you have some stories to share.  Please do.

Office girls in China gather for a meeting. Wonder if the businessmen at this office find it difficult to concentrate?